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Digital Innovation for the Public Good

Catalyzing Collaborative Research for High Impact

The UC Noyce Initiative's mission is to advance research collaborations in critical areas of digital technology and innovation to drive informed, ethical and timely discovery for the public good. 
 

It brings together researchers from five UC campuses Berkeley, Davis, Irvine, San Francisco, and Santa Barbara by building community and awarding competitive grants focused in these key areas:

Ann S. Bowers 1937-2024

Ann S. Bowers 1937-2024

Ann Schmeltz Bowers, a technology industry executive pioneer and longtime philanthropist who inspired the founding of the UC Noyce Initiative, died on January 24, 2024, at her home in Palo Alto, California. She was 86.

The Power of Five

The power and potential of the UC Noyce Initiative lies in our cooperative spirit. Together, we are driving discovery around the most pressing challenges and exciting opportunities in digital innovation. Learn more about the Power of Five.

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News

Fundamental Physics to Build Computers of the Future

When he was 12 years old, Hartmut Haeffner got his first computer— a Commodore 64. On the C64, Haeffner learned to program, first for fun and then as a job, using the computer to track sporting events in his native Germany. He was fascinated with both what the computer could do, and the underlying technology that made it possible.

When Data Science Meets Medicine

As a child, Bin Yu never dreamed she’d go to college. She grew up in China during the Cultural Revolution, when nearly all of the country’s institutions of higher learning were closed. But in third grade, a cousin gave Yu a math book. She fell in love with the structured way of thinking and the concrete answers found in the textbook.

Novel brain implant helps paralyzed woman speak using a digital avatar

Emerging speech neuroprostheses may offer a way to communicate for people who are unable to speak due to paralysis or disease, but fast, high-performance decoding has not yet been demonstrated. Now, transformative new work by researchers at UCSF and UC Berkeley shows that more natural speech decoding is possible using the latest advances in artificial intelligence.